Rose Lindsay

Rose Lindsay, PMHNP-C is the 2018-2019 recipient of the Evelyn Barclay Scholarship. Rose, a native of New York, began nursing as an Associate Degree graduate in 1999 from Sullivan County Community College (SCCC). While working as a medical-surgical nurse and lab/clinical instructor at SCCC, Rose received a BSN from SUNY Stony Brook. Mrs. Lindsay next took a position as a medical surgical nurse at Horton Hospital, now Orange Regional Medical Center.

Rose earned a Master’s degree in the Adult Nurse Practitioner Program at Mount Saint Mary College in Newburgh, NY. Then she worked as nurse educator and stroke coordinator at Orange Regional Medical Center while attending a post-master’s psychiatric nurse practitioner program at SUNY, Stony Brook, earning her certificate in 2012. Since 2013, Rose has worked in psychiatry in an outpatient setting of a private practice and in 2015 she also began working for an outpatient mental health clinic of Orange Regional Medical Center with an interdisciplinary team.

Rose’s inspiration to pursue a doctor of nursing practice degree is to be a part of the movement toward elevating the nursing profession to the stature she believes the profession deserves. She understands that today’s nurses need to have skills that go beyond the academic and clinical theories learned at the undergraduate level. Rose aspires to be prepared to tackle the challenges we face in today’s world of fast paced, ever changing, multi-factored complexity of health care.

Mrs. Lindsay’s area of interest in her DNP program at New York University is mental health and the older adult in the homecare setting. Depression is the most common mental health illness older adults and is responsible for medical co-morbidities, poor quality of life, mortality, and exorbitant healthcare costs.

Rose is currently working with a nonprofit home care agency in New York City to improve the recognition of older adults with depression through education of acute care and home health care providers. She has learned through the course of her studies that despite the prevalence of this serious illness, many older adults suffering from depression are unidentified, undertreated or untreated.